The Mary Rose

Graham

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Feb 27, 2016
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#62
Thanks very much, guys.
Planking is a good time to ponder the next stages of the build and my mind has turned towards decoration on this ship. The ships were highly decorated in order to '....glorify the King's majesty', i.e. show off a lot. I am proposing to use waterslide decals made using PowerPoint and got the idea and some good information from Grayson72 who is building the Wells Fargo Stagecoach - check out his excellent build log on this site.
I have scanned all bulkheads and gunwhales and the waist rail below is an example -

Waist 1.PNG

This gives me an actual size picture to scale onto. Now I can overlay the designs made using PowerPoint -

Waist 2.PNG

From here I can play around with the sizes and designs until I am happy with them. I think I will certainly stick with the upper design which features the Tudor Green colour and the St George's Cross, both of which I like and I think might have featured strongly. These designs would have been painted on to individual panels on the actual ship, some of which were fixed and some removable - removable in order to enable the archers to get a clear shot and not shoot through the anti-boarding netting above their heads. Anyway, I just thought I'd share the idea with you and I need to finish the planking first but that might slow down a bit because my fishing season starts at the weekend and I'm off to catch some carp. Fishing is a bit like building these ships - sometimes you have great days, sometimes it all goes wrong and you wonder why the Hell you bother. Here's hoping for some sunshine and a few tight lines!
 

zoly99sask

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Blandford Group Build
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#64
Hello Graham,how is the Mary Rose coming along,any updates on your build?
 

Graham

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#65
Hi Zoltan,
Thanks for your prompt on my build log regarding any progress to report. My last entry coincided with the start of the lake and river fishing season here in the UK, so that is pretty much what I am doing, and it has been a good Summer. I expect I will get back to the build around late September and you can be sure that I will keep you all posted. Regards.
 

Graham

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Feb 27, 2016
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#66
Back in the shipyard after a good Summer, some great fishing and all DIY/decorating completed and fully signed off by She Who Must Be Obeyed. It took me a couple of hours to sort things out and get back up to speed on where I am because I have not touched this build since April. However, the grey matter kicked back in and here we are cracking on with the Mary Rose - second layer of planking (walnut) down to the keel.

PA300002.JPG

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As you can see, Red was keen to help.

PA300004.JPG
 
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Graham

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Feb 27, 2016
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#70
Second planking now complete -

PB010007.JPG

PB010008.JPG

Right way up and the gun ports cut out -

PB040009.JPG

Sanding completed -

PB050010.JPG

At this point I gave the hull a wet down and had a close look at it. Due to the differences in the individual planks (I guess in a kit they aren't the highest quality you can get) there are bright spots, so I stained the hull to even it out -

PB050011.JPG

PB050012.JPG

Stain used was oil based medium oak with a dash of dark oak to give some contrast to the deck planking colour. I was a little worried that the charcoal edging I did on the planks would not stand up to the stain, but it seems to be OK.

Some plank facts from the actual ship -
1. From the keel to the level of the main deck the planking is 94 - 105mm thick, upwards of that it is 76mm.
2. The longest plank is 10.85m, the shortest is 1.47m, but most are between 4.5m and 9m long, the longest planks being in the midships area.
3. Seams between plank edges are caulked with a mixture of animal hair (from calves or cows) mixed with resin, the hair first being formed into rolls.
 
Joined
Feb 27, 2016
Messages
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#73
Thanks for your comments, guys, much appreciated. I have put on a couple of coats of enamel lacquer and it is now time to do the treenails. There are a few methods to be found on this forum using filler or toothpicks and they look great. However, I will call on my furniture and French Polishing skills (?) and use wax. The process is -
1. Apply a couple of coats of lacquer. You can not wax fill bare wood as it gets in the grain and looks messy; a lacquer coat seals the grain.
2. Soften some wax by melting in a tin and adding a few drops of turpentine. This is trial and error until you get the softness you require i.e. malleable when warmed in your hand.
3.Mark the holes - I use a dental pick.
4.Drill the holes - depends on scale and I used a 0.6mm bit.
5.Fill holes using a blunt penknife.
6.Scrape off the excess.

Here it is as work in progress -

IMG_20181119_133228.jpg

It is going well but it is mind-numbingly boring, so what I do is three or four 'strips' then take a break, do other tasks for a while, then get back to it. Here the fighting platforms or 'Crow's Nests' are coming together -

IMG_20181119_134249.jpg

Treenails on the actual ship are of oak with shanks of 38mm and heads of 40mm. The outboard ends are made tight by caulked splits being either an arrow cut of two lines, a cross shaped cut or three cuts forming a triangle. There is no evidence of a wooden wedge being driven into the treenails to expand them and most were used as through fastenings where the cut off inboard ends have been found loose in the hull spaces.
 
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