Stove, galley, oven, firehearth, chimney - tech. details and development over time at different navies

DocBlake

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#22
I thought I'd post the photos I took of my Brodie stove build.

I started scratch building the ship's stove Brodie1.jpg Brodie2.jpg Brodie3.jpg Brodie4.jpg Brodie5.jpg Brodie6.jpg Brodie7.jpg Brodie8.jpg Brodie10.jpg Brodie11.jpg for my 1:32 scale POF AVS. The kit provides a very nice 3-D printed stove, but I wanted my own. It's kind of a modified Brodie stove without the chain-driven rotisserie. The first step was to build a "core" out of 2 pieces of wood. I then added the sides out of 1/32" plywood. The grid irons are brass rod passing through holes drilled with a #75 drill. The boiler tops and lids are made of wood, the handles and the diagonal reinforcing rods are steel wire. The oven doors, firebox door and ash tray door are all 1/64" plywood...the hinges are cardstock. I made the spit racks out of brass rod, soldered them together and trimmed them to shape. I need to add the legs, build a grease pan and add some trim to the stove before priming and painting.


The photos show the finished stove. I still have to finish the grease tray. The stove was to have a guard rail surrounding the top cooking surface, but I felt I had to draw the line somewhere! The hinges and firebox door/oven doors are far from perfect...even in this scale every little error shows. Still, I do like working in the larger scales in general because of the detail it allows one to add


I was really disappointed in how the stove looked before painting ; wood, paper, bits of metal and contrasting colors looked like a 5 year old's project. But I kept telling myself that the paint will change everything. It brought it together and camouflaged all my errors!


I needed to install the stove on it's brick pad next. It was a close fit, and I first made the hatch with the hole for the Charley Noble so that I could glue the pad to the deck and the stove to the pad with epoxy once the alignment of the stack is right. While the long cure epoxy was curing, I installed beam #5 with it's carlings and ledges, glued the hatch in place and made any final adjustments before the epoxy set up


The stove was permanently glued into place. The hatches are positioned in place, and beam #5 was glued in.
 

Peglegreg

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#23
G'day Dave
I looooove it!
You have done super job mate, no one would guess it was made from wood.
Just a quick question mate. Do you know what was the covering of the chimney?
Happymodeling
Greg
 

DocBlake

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#24
Thanks, Greg!
The plenum is just pine, shaped as needed. The stove pipe leading from the plenum is brass tubing. The stove pipe visible on deck is brass tubing soldered at an angle, and sized to fit over the lower pipe, then blackened. I used self etching primer to prime the stove, and then flat black paint.
 

Peglegreg

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#25
Thanks for that Dave. But what I was after is 'Was the chimney on the real ship covered in anything too prevent the heat burning the decks?'
I'm building the Royal Caroline and it's chimney is a peculiar shape. To me that may mean a heat preventer skin over the chimney. This is only assumption and I've been doing research with no prevail to find the answer........;)
Thanks again Dave
Greg
 

Uwek

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#28
"Blake's improved firehearth for 150 Men and Officers Scale 3 inches to the foot 1868."

Found in the archive of the NMM

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Scale: 1:4. A model of a ships firehearth and cooking galley. The model is largely constructed in polished wood with brass fittings. It is comprised of two sections, the larger of which provides for the officers and can be moved away from the main body of the apparatus and is supported by two horizontal brass rods on either side. There are two large doors on both the officer's and the crew side, which are hinged at the base and to the side, together with two ranges or hotplates above. There is a central rectangular section raised above the cooking area which comprises of three compartments covered by lids with brass handles, and two circular raised lids with turned bone handles. There is a smaller raised rectangular section which comprises of two ventilation shafts with baffles, which can be opened or closed by a pair of brass handles on the side. There are three large taps fitted on both sides together with a series of brass safety rails and a pair of moveable brass rods for securing cooking pots during rough conditions. Plaques attached to model inscribed "Model of officers end of fire hearth. Made with furnace when required. To obtain the size of fire hearths above 150 men, draw this Officers end from the Hearth, two inches and a quarter, for every 100 Men, up to 550 Men, as marked on the Rods at the sides.", "Blake's improved firehearth for 150 Men and Officers Scale 3 inches to the foot 1868.", "Blakes's firehearth & cooking galley, as fitted to ships in H.M. Service." and "Lamb & Co.".
Read more at http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/68388.html#K5zQ3x1hLs7uPAHS.99

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Scale: 1:4. Chimney for the model of a ships firehearth and cooking galley.
Read more at http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/558161.html#O1OzPrGuIP8OX6gm.99
 

Uwek

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#29
fire hearth and galley for 36-gun fifth Rate warships and 270 men in 1780


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Scale: 1:16. Plan showing the plan, sections and elevations of a fire hearth and galley for 36-gun fifth Rate warships and 270 men. A copy was sent to the Navy Board. Reverse notes 'Shaded by Joseph Norris, 24 July 1780' - the same person who was noted on ZAZ7934.
Read more at http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/382832.html#8qzgjRY5WqaOEfIk.99
 

Uwek

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#30
fire hearth, oven and copper for 64-gun Third Rate two-decker warships with 500 men in 1780


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Scale: 1:16. Plan showing the plan, elevations and sections for a fire hearth, oven and copper for 64-gun Third Rate two-decker warships with 500 men. The plan includes a key to the hearth. A copy was sent to the Navy Board. A note, bottom right, states 'Joseph Take care and shade light / July 14.'
Read more at http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/382835.html#1tMqUKfG5FpQ8Yu1.99
 

Uwek

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#32
galley hearth (stove) 'supposed' to be for Royal Sovereign (1786), a 100-gun First Rate, three-decker

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No scale. Plan showing the elevation of the front, back and side, and a section for the galley hearth (stove) 'supposed' to be for Royal Sovereign (1786), a 100-gun First Rate, three-decker.
 

Uwek

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#33
Brodie stove / copper kettles for boiling ca 1780

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Until the middle of the eighteenth century, ships had large copper kettles for boiling the crew's food, set into brick hearths. After that, all-metal stoves were used. Brodie stoves were an improvement on the origional model. The lids of the kettles on this model are almost out of sight in this view behind the chimney. The more sophisticated cooking facilities were reserved for the officers.
Read more at http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/37331.html#gPfUpyuyTGzTa0xx.99
 
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