Steam Launch Borkum by neptune - Krick - 1/12 scale - with steam engine built from Stuart Turner cas

neptune

Active Member
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
479
Points
28

Location
Adelaide, South Australia.
#1
I would like to re post this build log on SOS forum, I started building this kit and engine a couple of years ago and I am still working on it, hope you enjoy.



G'day all,  I am building a Steam launch kit made by Krick, it is the Borkum 1/12 scale, it has an ABS hull, and all the rest is wood so I hope it is OK in this section of the build logs.


I am installing a steam engine, it is built from a Stuart Turner casting set along with various brass bar and brass and steel rod,
 I have all ways wanted to build one of these and I must say that if any model engineers look at this log please understand it is my first and probably only attempt at this.

on approximately the second page of this log I start building the launch.


This shows what comes in the casting set.


This is how I set up to machine the Standard, the main upright piece that holds and guides the con rod, the piston and also the pot that goes on top.
  the dowell was a really tight fit and with the use of the live centre suported the standard.


machining the feet of the standard,          (  I can hear all the real machinists screaming in agony )


  machining the seat of the standard


The sole plate and box bed as supplied


This  is called the sole plate and is shown after machining and the holes have been drilled and tapped
and also the seats for the bearings have been filed.


Checking the bearings against seat.
 

Attachments

neptune

Active Member
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
479
Points
28

Location
Adelaide, South Australia.
#2
The pot or clynder as supplied, next to it are the brass for the piston and the steel for the eccentric sheave



The pot after boring and maching.
 


The pot after milling the start of the steam channels.
  also shows the drilling and tapping, in the background you can see the lid.


In the process of turning the piston, mostly they just had three oil rings turned, but some had a larger groove
in which was embedded a cord soaked in graphite. The piston will be cut off where the wide channel is.


checking for fit


This is after the steam ways have been drilled and the piston finished and fitted to its rod.


the piston, rod and small end after maching and fitting to-gether.
 

Attachments

neptune

Active Member
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
479
Points
28

Location
Adelaide, South Australia.
#4
Next up is the crankshaft, they give you a piece of steel bar that has to be cut in two for
making the sides, I cut it in two and soft soldered them to-gether for drilling the holes foe the shafts
to go through.
 the pic shows the bar marked out for drilling.


they give you one length of steel rod to cut the shafts out of,
 So I cut the small shaft first and turned the ends down to size,
Then what is left goes through the larger holes in one length and is set in place,
they give you two options, either Silver solder or lock tite,
I chose to use Loctite and as an added precaution drilled through the bar and shaft and fixed a brass pin through
 you can see it in the pics.
24 hours later after the loctite has set I cut the middle piece out leaving the crankshaft as per the pic.
 

Attachments

neptune

Active Member
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
479
Points
28

Location
Adelaide, South Australia.
#5
These first three pics show the material provided for the big end and the small end






Boring out for the Eccentric Sheave.



This shows the Eccentric sheave strap and the big end bearings after machining



another view



crank shaft with big end bolted on



 another view



  and bolted in place through the bearings and onto the sole plate and box bed with the machined standard in the background.
 

Attachments

neptune

Active Member
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
479
Points
28

Location
Adelaide, South Australia.
#7
Turning the valve adjusting rod, a follower rest would have been handy, but I had to make do with drilling the end and using the live centre.
 


  Tapping the valve slide adjusting plate, its just a mall plate thats sits in the valve adjusting assembly.
 


This piece of brass was approx 1/2 inch long, I have drilled and tapped it 5ba, you can see it after machining in the next pic.



the finished valve rod, it has been threaded 5ba on each end, and the connecting link above after machining.


How they will be connected together



The engine bolted to-gether temporarily to make sure everything fits
 
        Still have a ways to go yet, thanks for looking,
 
 

Attachments

neptune

Active Member
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
479
Points
28

Location
Adelaide, South Australia.
#8
A drawing showing the exploded view of the engine



The top and bottom cylinder covers, the one on the left is the bottom cover showing the underneath, these were turned from a piece of cast iron approx 1 1/2 inches long and just over the finished dia size.



Shows the bottom cover, this one has a longer length and it has a hole drilled and threaded for the valve gland nut which is sitting next to it, which was turned out of brass, in the bottom of the cover there has been drilled a small hole for the con rod to go through, when assembled packing is inserted into hole surrounding the rod and then the screw is tightened to compress the packing material to help keep in the steam.



shows the nut in place.
 



close up of the top of the standard



shows the rod going through with the piston attached



Top cover sitting in place
 



overall view
 

Attachments

neptune

Active Member
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
479
Points
28

Location
Adelaide, South Australia.
#9
This shows the internal workings of the Valve Chest



Shows the rod in place and the plate above waiting to be put in place



The valve plate in position



The plate pushed up showing the lower opening



The plate in the down position showing the upper opening,



shows the eccentric strap and rod just held in position, luckily at the moment everything seems to move Ok, fingers crossed.
 

Attachments

neptune

Active Member
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
479
Points
28

Location
Adelaide, South Australia.
#10
I have now received my Krick kit of the Borkum Steam Launch, see attached Photo,



The box as delivered.
 



These pics how the laser cut parts, they are very cleanly cut and the ply looks very good quality



another view



This and the next pic show the parts removed from the sheets, they just droped out.







They in clude the parts to make a stand





The pack of strip wood which looks very good.
 

Attachments

neptune

Active Member
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
479
Points
28

Location
Adelaide, South Australia.
#11
These first three pics show the ABS hull, which is trimmed compltely to shape and very cleanly moulded.
 





The running gear includes the Skeg, prop, shaft and tube along with some sundry
brass items. The Prop will be polished before fitting.

The sheet of plans which are 1-1 for the model.
 
 

Attachments

Joined
Sep 10, 2017
Messages
67
Points
18

Location
The Netherlands
#12
Hi John,

Great job, missed this one in your signature listing.
I have been sailing with this model, my father is a fanatic model steamer, mainly trains, but builded this some 10-15 years ago with a gas fired boiler and we sailed it with radio control.
Must be lots of fun to build your own running steam engine and mix wood and iron working on the same project.
Enjoy.

regs Maarten.
 

neptune

Active Member
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
479
Points
28

Location
Adelaide, South Australia.
#13
G'day Maarten, sorry I'm late replying, it must have been fun sailing her on steam, I'm having mine to run on electric but to look like steam, cuts out all the fuss with having to get the boiler checked every year, thanks for dropping in,

Best regards John.
 
Joined
Aug 25, 2017
Messages
77
Points
8

Location
Moira N.I.
#14
Hi john, have read this right, you are building a steam engine, doing some amazing metalworking, but when you fit it to the Launch it will run using an electric motor. I realise you probably need a Boiler and Engine steam pressure test but it would be a pity not to see that engine run under it's own steam (pun intended),

Cheers Andy
 

neptune

Active Member
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
479
Points
28

Location
Adelaide, South Australia.
#15
G'day Andy, its not only getting the boiler checked each year but also the cost of buying one, approx $1000, and I cannot justify that expense for the number of times I will sail her on the pond, the main thing I wanted was to build one of these Stuart Turner engines, I've built a fake boiler witch will have a smoke make installed, so when on the pond it will look just like steam, thanks for dropping by,

best regards John.
 

neptune

Active Member
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
479
Points
28

Location
Adelaide, South Australia.
#18
I bought some additional accessories, steam gauge, although I will not have the model running on steam for reasons mentioned earlier on in the log, I wanted to make up a dummy Boiler and wanted it to look the part.



next are two check valves which I will use for the water gauge on the boiler.
 



The brass funnel which only cost me $10, not worth making one.



A box of 1/12 scale tools



Ships wheel and cordage which came with the kit



Painting the engine



The painted wheel
 

Attachments

neptune

Active Member
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
479
Points
28

Location
Adelaide, South Australia.
#19
Drilled the holes for the Prop shaft and Rudder tubes
 



The rudder tube with reinforcing pieces



Skeg attached



Stand assembled
 

Skeg with Rudder post
 



Rudder post supports attached



The parts for the rudder



Shows the notches I put on the rudder post to give the Araldite something to grip on



Checking the alignment of the skeg and rudder post
 

Attachments

neptune

Active Member
Joined
May 25, 2017
Messages
479
Points
28

Location
Adelaide, South Australia.
#20
Rear ot stern bulkhead glued and clamped



Front of the stern bulkhead



The Bow bulkhead assembled, all of these parts went together with the minimum of sanding.



The bow bulkhead glued in place on the under side of the deck piece, I added some support pieces for extra security.



Another view which also shows the Tabs glued in place to support the coaming that goes around the inside.
 



With the Camber of the deck I had trouble holding the bulkhead to the deck because of the lack of anything to fasten to so I made a small slit on each side of the bulkhead so I could get a grip with the clamps.



Close up of the slit with the clamps.
 

Attachments