Royal James sloop

didit

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2017
Messages
830
Points
93

#61
The problem is fixed by "cutting" the garboard plank to fit the hull.

lets take a look at how the shipwright solved the problem a look at a hull you can see at the stern the garboard and bottom planks flare out the bottom yellow arrow is the lower edge of the garboard against the keel and the next yellow arrow up it the top edge of the garboard. The next two bottom planks the flare gets less the higher up the stern post. The gap that occurs is filled in by the shape of the plank and the run of the plank will follow the hull.

closeup stern_edited-1.jpg

this picture gives you a better example of the flare of the bottom planks. It is this flare at the ends that allow the bottom planks to take a natural curve.

tecu1B.jpg

looking at the bow of the garboard the end is called the "hood" and it fills the lower space created by the natural upper sweep of the garboard plank.
The next plank up is the bottom plank and it also has a flare. The planks in the blue arrow part notice are much narrower this is because the next belt of planking has to conserve space along the stem or you will end up with a gap at midship and no room for the ends of the planks at the stem.

ALVIN stem_edited-1.jpg
 

didit

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2017
Messages
830
Points
93

#62
The final shape of the garboard looks like this and it will lay nice and flat all along the bottom of the hull. you can see why a wider plank is needed to shape the garboard.

garboard plank.jpg

keeping with scale lengths of planking the cardboard pattern was used and the garboard is made in two pieces.

garboard1.jpg

The garboard plank on one edge fits nice and snug into the keel rabbit and the upper edge takes a gentle curve of the hull. To accomplish this the garboard was cut to fit and not bent to fit the hull.

gar7.jpg
 

didit

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2017
Messages
830
Points
93

#63
Bending and clamping planks to the hull is always a concern just looking at the front section of the garboard the end has to bend and twist to fit the stem. That seems to be pushing the limits of what a plank will do without breaking or splitting. The end has to take almost a 90 degree twist.

garboard2.jpg

you can see here if the end is held against the stem the plank has to twist and bend to lay flat to the bottom of the hull and slip into the rabbit.

plank flex4.jpg
 

didit

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2017
Messages
830
Points
93

#64
You might find this hard to believe but the garboard was bent and twisted dry and without the use of one of those plank benders you heat up.
soaking the plank and steam heat does help in bending planks. One draw back is this method softens the plank and being soft clamps tend to leave a mark.

What I did was to use a wood that actually bends as you can see here.

plank flex2.jpg

and you can also twist it 90 degrees

plank flex1.jpg

no magic was used in the demonstration of bending the wood all it took was a wood suitable for bending AND using aged wood not kiln dried wood. Kiln dried wood makes it brittle aged wood maintains it natural elasticity.
 

didit

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2017
Messages
830
Points
93

#65
the next plank to fit is the first bottom plank laying the plank on the top edge of the garboard it follows the edge and leaves a gap. i do not want to force the plank down because it will want to spring edgewise.

bottom 1.jpg

if i bend the plank with the curve of the hull there is a slight overlap of the garboard.

bottom 2.jpg

i drew a line along the bottom of the bottom plank

to get the bottom plank to lay natural and flat to the hull i will sand off the extra material on the garboard.

bottom 3.jpg

Here you can see what has to be removed from the top edge of the garboard

bottom 4.jpg

sanding the edge of the plank i use a sanding sled which is nothing more than a small block of wood with a pieces of sanding belt glued to the side. I also nipped off the front edge so the block does not get caught on anything. the sanding goes very quick and easy.

sand block.jpg
 

didit

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2017
Messages
830
Points
93

#66
a strake is a run of planks that run longitudinally along the hull from on end to the other.

strake_edited-1.jpg


a proper planking job has all the stakes of planking running the full length of the hull from stem to sternpost which in order for all the strakes to fit, the ends at the bow have to be tapered.

1540829361024.jpg


looking close at the first bottom plank it has a flare to it. This plank was spiled to fit the hull. This is done by taking measurements from a batten running along the hull and measurements are taken from the batten to the top of the garboard and the bottom edge of the plank is cut to fit thus filling that gap we saw when the plank was run to the hull curve.

L005.jpg


What i did with the bottom plank you could call reverse spiling because i cut the top of the garboard to fit the bottom of the next plank.
 

didit

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2017
Messages
830
Points
93

#67
fitting the bottom plank requires extreme bending and very often clamping is a problem and at times the plank will move and you don't notice it until you remove the clamps. My solution to the problem is the glue the end of the plank in place and allow the glue to dry. This requires little force and all you need to do is snug the plank into position.

bottom 5.jpg

bottom 6a.jpg


when the glue is setup the end of the plank it secure in place so i can bend the plank and hold it with push pins. An advantage to using the sign board as filler between bulkheads is it is dense enough it will hold the pins so they do not pop out from the pressure of the bent plank.

bottom 7.jpg
 

didit

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2017
Messages
830
Points
93

#68
At the stern the plank will follow the curve of the hull and sweep upwards leaving a gap

bottom 8.jpg


Here is where i cut the plank to fit the hull and fill in the gap and you can see the shape of the plank. another method is to use a stealer to fill the gap

bottom 9.jpg

stealer.jpg
 

didit

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2017
Messages
830
Points
93

#69
depending on the shape and size of the hull determines the amount of bottom planks used. Two or three works for this size hull so from here i establish the first belt of planking by using 4 pieces of planking at the mid section and bending a batten to the curve of the hull

1540829796051.jpg


By doing this i know where the upper line of the belt of planking is and the taper of the planks. midship it takes 4 plank widths, at the stern 3 and at the bow 2 1/2

belt 2.jpg

belt 5.jpg

belt 3.jpg

belt 4.jpg
 

didit

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2017
Messages
830
Points
93

#70
now I have to catch up with the build log and plank up the other side then we can continue with the first belt of planking.

so while I am planking the other side take a break and look at the planking on some of these high end models

https://www.shipsofscale.com/sosfor...chefort-france-18-th-21-st-october-2018.2050/

planking a hull the correct way is an art unto itself and the pride of a master shipwright. I understand for many this is a hobby and having fun with it is the prime concern. However, there is nothing wrong with pointing out the wrong way to plank a hull just in case your planning on entering a model is a show like the one above OR you just want to challenge yourself.

what not to do

planking is cut and shaped to fit the curves and shape of a hull or you end up with gaps and the plank run does not flow with a sweet curve.

gaps.jpg
the strakes as a whole tapper or you will run out of room at the stem

76-0-8.jpg

hum the builder got into trouble early in laying out the belts of planking

27415.jpg

nice looking planking BUT remember all strakes run to the stem and not under the wale

hull16c.jpg

a "hard" bend which has nothing to do with the planking and this is because of no bevel to the bulkhead and the hollow space between the bulkheads give no form to the hull so the planks will lay flat

hard bend1_edited-1.jpg

master shipwrights took a lot of time to plan out the run and shape of planking in what is called an expansion drawing

drawing planks.jpg

planking by the spiling numbers

closeup1_edited-1.jpg

and if you are really good you can do this

plank 2_edited-1.jpg
 
Last edited:

donfarr

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
713
Points
63

#71
Itwo messages, first the very BAD ONE, I to know what the toll of DEMENTIA takes on the care giver, as my THE LOVE OF MY LIFE MY LATE WIFE TERESA had this it is horrible disease and yes I know what Dave and others are going thru one thing that I do know AS A CAREGIVER IT IS EXHASTING, metally and physically, if you do not take a break it will drive you MAD to be of use to your love ed ones you need to TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF, In my case they tell us we were very lucky, with CARE AND HER WONDERFULL SENCE OF HUMOR it was livable for us, ONLY THE LAST 4 or 5 months was UNBEARABLE,,,,,,,,now to something more pleasant as always DAVE great THREAD AND LEARNING PROCESS FOR ME, one question could you show how on SPILEING how do you HOLD EITHER THE BOND BOARD OR A SCRAP PIECE OF WOOD TO GET THE COMPASS to pass over the plank to get the correct shape,I am talking about a hull that has bulkheads not filled but open, THIS HAS BEEN A BIG PROBLEM FOR ME IN SPILEING, which I believe is the best way to get a good planking job, the extra material compared with the results are well worth it, I will take no more time of your thread at this time but will have QUESTIONS ON DOWN THE LINE, and Dave I am going to emil you with a question on my Band Saw, will not clog up your thread. Don
 

didit

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2017
Messages
830
Points
93

#72
I to know what the toll of DEMENTIA takes on the care giver it is horrible disease

this is
Alice in wonderland mom is sleepwalking in a reality she makes up minute by minute there is no reason or logic you can not tell her to do anything or ask why she did something. There are socks in the oven and green beans in the desk the queen is on her head and there is no time it is 1953 other times it is 1964.
the only thing that she holds tight to is the house she lived in for 56 years so there she will stay under constant watch of the care givers. So everyday it is down the rabbit hole

DEMENTIA is cruel but by some twisted mercy it is a ghost mom does not see or understand there is no pain just a sugar cube slowing melting away in a cup of tea.

there is no break this is a task set before me, deal with it!
 

donfarr

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
713
Points
63

#73
Dave, Do what you need to do, BUT TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF OR YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO DO WHAT IS NEEDED, My wife at one time put envolopes in the fridge, and you are EXACTLY RIGHT they are in there own reality, again I say if you HAVE NETFLIX see if you can get the GLEN CAMBULL I GOT to be ME I think it is called, WILL EXPLAIN A LOT, like I said we were VERY LUCKY TO HAVE HER BY THE GRACE OF JESUS IN A STATE WHERE IT WAS LIVABLE FOR A GOOD NUMBER OF YEARS, she would be asleep and go to the bathroom and I would wake up and she was not in bed IFOUND HER CRYING IN THE LIVEING ROOM SHE GOT LOST IN THE HOUSE, but the experts tell us thgat her sence of humor was a GOD SEND TO KEEP HER AT THAT STAGE, TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF.Don
 

ron0909

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2018
Messages
99
Points
53

Location
Ottawa, Canada
#74
I don't know how well I would hold up if my better half were to suffer from dementia. My wife had a ruptured frontal lobe aneurysm about 3 years back resulting in mental stresses and symptoms that will plague her for life. When she was in a induced coma following the surgery, they told me that we wouldn't know how bad things would be until she comes to. I was on my knees praying to the Almighty for my Jenny and it breaks my heart seeing her struggle every day since then. My hope would be to follow through and stay strong for her as you have done for yours. I will say a few prayers tonight for everyone here.

Back onto this excellent mini planking tutorial...I can't wait to see the rest! I have now attempted Granado's hull 3 different times and have ripped it off in frustration. I'll be here watching :)
 

didit

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2017
Messages
830
Points
93

#76
Fantastic planking info the picture below that planking is known as Dutch style planking.

I do not know for sure but I have found no references to "dutch style planking" where the planks end under the wale. for one thing that would make a very weak hull planking. In the plank expansion posted above the shipwrights went to extreme methods to lock the strakes of planking together, they did this to help prevent the hull from hogging. If all the upper strakes ended under the wales you would have a long seam running along the hull, when the hull hogged that seam would open up.

I read someplace ship carpenters and master shipwrights from England worked in Dutch shipyards because there were only so many jobs available so ship builders sought work where they could find it. Ship builders were banned from coming to North America so they went to other countries. The big Dutch shipyards were run my English master shipwrights and I do not think they would build a hull with such a glaring flaw.

it is possible this Dutch style is mistaken for the use of drop planks where a strake stopped short of the stem and drop planks were used but this entailed complex and often elaborate joinery, it was much easier to plan out the run of planking.

I could be totally wrong on this and I am wide open for any historical reference to the Dutch style of planking
 

epicdoom

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2018
Messages
711
Points
93

Location
Baltimore, Maryland USA
#77
Dutch style of planking was not the best way to plank depending on who you asked. who ever planked this ship did it correctly as there are to be no pointed ends in planking anywhere. I read about this style of planking a few years ago it. The 2 styles are said to be English and Dutch style with English method tapering the planks aka spilling. I dont remember where I read about the Dutch style but it is a real thing and real ships were planked that way. It was said that the hull wouldn't be a strong as with the English method. I have no info on if that were true or not and it was the english who made the claim supposedly. I'll try and find the article I read about it when I get home from work.
 

didit

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2017
Messages
830
Points
93

#78
the first belt of planking does not require any shaping of the planks, all they need is to be tapered. The trick to a good taper is keeping it straight and that can be a problem if your trying to cut the taper along a straight edge. Depending on the wood used and the thickness of the material you may need more than one pass to get through the wood which requires you cutting in the exact same cut. Another problem is sometimes the knife wants to follow the grain of the wood and not along the straight edge.

Here is what I do when it comes to cutting tappers in planks I learned this from hanging around with machinists, they spend a lot of time with jigs and setting up a job.
I use a vice and two strips of steel flat stock, you can get this in most any hardware store.

tp1.jpg

make sure the vice has a bed so the steel strips don't just fall through the jaws and the bed sets both strips level with each other.

tp2.jpg

set your plank between the steel strips, if your really about exactness you can measure the taper personally I just do it by eye and call it close enough.
Clamp down on the vice and the steel strips hold the plank really tight, it is not going to move.

tp3.jpg tp4.jpg

I use the steel strips because for one thing the vice jaws are not long enough and second all I need is that 3/32 flat edge as a guide.

tp5.jpg

when you shave the plank you have to get that curl if not your going the wrong way. Wood grain has a nape to it
like fur on your pet. One way your cut will be short chips the other way it shaves off in nice clean shavings

tp6.jpg

I like to use new sharp blades mostly scalpel blades because they are very sharp. You know you got it when the blade glides along the edge of the steel. You can not gouge the plank or make an uneven cut so keep going until the blade no longer cuts then you will have a perfect taper.

tp7.jpg
 
Top