Panart: San Felipe 1:75 Scale Build Log

Donnie

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I forgot to add one more jig to the bunch and this is how I added the extra layer to the port lids. Also following is "Yet Another Jig" that I created to help hold the cannon port lid while drilling holes and using the same jig to help hold it while I glue in the ring bolts and things. I am undecided about the brass nails if I should blacken them too. Even though it look nice, in reality, the brass nails do not exist, but rather would be black.

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Donnie

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Even I do show some of the construction process. I thought I was show the assembly. Each lid is made up of 11 pieces. After each lid, I have to go back and cut the excess nail length off and touch up red paint and in some cases use a brush to touch up the blackening.

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Hi Donnie, #3, because that is apparently the correct position. When the gun is fired there is a certain amount of 'blowback' caused by air behind the ball that is forced backwards, powerful enough to totally destroy the lids if not tied back against the hull. When the ships were on show the lids would be in position #1.
Regards
Eric
 

Donnie

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Thanks Eric, Maarten, and Uwek. Interesting as I would not have guessed #3. I have seen the #3 rarely on some models and it is now kind of funny that I thought they were doing it wrong. Ha. Oh well. I am glad I asked. I had thought also about closing some lids near the bow and near stern, but I guess that would not make much sense.
 

Uwek

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:........... Interesting as I would not have guessed #3. I have seen the #3 rarely on some models and it is now kind of funny that I thought they were doing it Wrong...........
I guess these modelers want to show their hinges, but not thinking about how it would be in reality.......but I am not so 100% sure any more.
After some research in the web and in my books, I think it is somehow between 2 and 3.
Important I guess was also the height of the deck by itself and the possible geometry of the tackles for opening and closing the lids.
Take a look at this photo, which is an excerpt from Jean Boudriot´s book about the 74 gun ship
IMG_27741.jpg

If you take a look at this situation it will be clear, that it was important, on which height were
1) the hinge of the lid where is the turning and fixed point
2) in which height were the holes (do not know the correct term) where the tackle for the lid is going through the hull planking
and
3) in which height is in the different times (closed, half open and open lid) are the ring bolts for the lid-tackles.
In addition it was surely important, that at every situation and angle of the ship in wind, the listing, the lids could be closed only with leaving free the tackles.......
see herefore the wiki page under tactics:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun_port

some more photos out of Lavery, Goodwin and Boudriot / Delacroix 64 gun ship Le Fleuron
IMG_27721.jpg IMG_27731.jpg

IMG_27751.jpg

When you take a look at the HMS Victory´s lids they are shown now more or less horizontal, maybe because of the tackles......but we have to check the drawings of the Victory
poi_2-o-3.jpg

Maybe you have the possibility to check all these data on your vessel?
I saw also historical Navy board models, where the angle are different on the same deck level......maybe this could be because of the different geometry of the deck hights.......I am sure you can find some examples in my book reviews from Lavery and Gardiner (click on title)
The Sailing Frigate: A History in Ship Models
The Ship of the Line: A History in Ship Models
Wooden Warship Construction: A History in Ship Models
 

Donnie

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Thank you Undersea ! :) and Also Uwek for that great info. I find it very helpful !! :)

Well, onto my next invention ( but not really). It is a tool I design from my thoughts. I wanted two flats on a bar that the bar could be held in a vise securely. Then on the other end, I wanted a tip that measures as close to 1mm as I can. (actual measurement when finish was 1.06mm) I think that is close enough.
The tip also has a "shelf" of which the mini needle-nose pliers will "rest" on while the tool is turned to help create the Ring Bolts for Cannon Lids. I was using a plain piece of 1mm brass wire, but it could not continue its service as brass you know is soft. This tool is made out of carbon Steel which is fair.

The flats was made using a Milling machine with Bar standing vertical. Then onto the Lathe of final make of tip. It should be obvious that the "length" of the 1mm tip should not be too long as "flexture" will occur and actually will bend out of shape. So, no physics here, just some common sense. about 1:4 ratio
1mm diameter vs. 4mm length. (also like .5 mm diameter tip and 2 mm length).

The length of finish tip is exactly 3.92 x diameter of 1.06 mm I think that is close enough.



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