Mantua Sergal's Le Soleil Royal

GaryM

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#1
Since the level of detail a person may add and the availability and amount of research a person may chose to perform will vary with each modeler, the times I show are related to the actual work performed on the vessel. Each person’s ability to read and interpret plans can vary a great detail. Thus, the time reflects only that used to measure the plans for comparison on the vessel or to determine the size of wood used to make a part that is unclear and not listed in the instructions or on the plans separately. Hopefully, by doing this, a person can use this as a guide to determine the level of commitment necessary to compete this type of project or can use it to gauge how far along they are if building the same vessel.

The English translation is "The Royal Sun". The picture shows the ship after 400 hours of work to do the double planking and cut the cannon ports. The ports were even spaced based upon the model in the Louve in France and Heller's plastic model. I purchased shots from the museum to verify this. The only ship to have uneven spacing that I know of was the Soverign of the Seas. The ornamentation was more important to the king since it showed status. The Soliel Royal kit was not designed for this and I had to modify it as much as possible to make things fit. This make it really a challenge to get the cannons put in. I am currently completing most of the outside and will submit more pictures when this is done.
Le Soleil Royal 01a.jpg Le Soleil Royal 02a.jpg Le Soleil Royal 03a.jpg
 
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Seafever

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#2
What a Job ! It must have been a nightmare to line up all those port holes ! You've taken on one of my favorite model's I have to keep up with this build Log keep the posts and photo's coming !
 

Donnie

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#3
I agree 100% - This is some fantastic work on the gun frames. Can't wait to see more and to watch this ship take shape. The Royal Soliel is one of my favorites too.
 

papership

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#5
Holy Cow Batman, that is a Bad Mama Jama. Another of my favorite ships. I built this back in the 70's from the Heller plastic kit and it was a monster, so I can only guess what it takes to build it in a wood version.
I will watch this one with interest.
And may I say howdy, I am Rick and am glad to see you posting here.
 

GaryM

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#6
I noticed several comments about soaking planks to get the proper curve. This is a lengthy process and streches the molucles to make the bend. Thus, creating a weaker plank. Before Amati came out with a heated plank bending iron, I used to use a candle which was a tricky process. By using direct heat, the molecules are realigned to fit the curve desired. No weak spots. After learning how to use the heating tool, you can make bends very fast and check how they fit and apply them as soon as they are correct. Prior to heating, I use the Panart hull holder to taper the planks. The plank on the front of my paddlewheeler that goes around the bow was 2 mm thick and 6 mm wide plywood. I do not remember exactly how long it took to bend but I think it was about 20 minutes. Thinner planks bend a lot faster and limewood is almost instantly bent using this method.

PHOTOS:
I used windows paint and was very please with the results. I am amazed at how much faster it loads and does not give me the invalid message. Thanks everyone for the suggestion.

THE SHIP:
This is a thinking persons ship. The instruction sequences were obviously written by a person who never tried to assemble it and provide decent drawing but otherwise are basically a parts list. The plans are good and everything is there to do the model.
Most kits grates have oversize holes. The holes are 2 1/2 inches or less, so I replaced these. Since the cannon spacing was change to meet the real ship, several methods had to be adopted to mount them.
Currently, there is 2,400 pieces on the ship.

Le Soleil Royal 04a.jpg Le Soleil Royal 05a.jpg Le Soleil Royal 06a.jpg Le Soleil Royal 07a.jpg Le Soleil Royal 08a.jpg Le Soleil Royal 09a.jpg Le Soleil Royal 10a.jpg
 

Seafever

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#7
I like the build it's really well done However my only issue and not just here but I see on so many model ships . The gratings not your fault propbably not in the kit . But There should be a frame around the gratings then a frame around that . If your looking for an authentic look that is . It looks good either way but I see a lot of models made by experts that leave out the inner frame . Read My posting under gratings for Photo's of what I am talking about . This is a huge project and is looking great ! Nice Job. Just thought I should let you know what I noticed . Not to offend anyone .Just trying to help .
 

GaryM

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I thought I would post some pictures of how the back is done before I paint it blue. The detail of the planking would be hard to see without seeing the model close hand. The ship now has over 2,700 pieces.

Le Soleil Royal 11a.jpg Le Soleil Royal 13a.jpg Le Soleil Royal 14a.jpg Le Soleil Royal 15a.jpg
 
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rdsaplala

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#9
Hello Gary,

That's an excellent First Rate you're building there, excellent work Sir, she's coming along beautifully, looking forward to more updates on your beautiful ship :)
 

GaryM

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#10
Thanks everyone. Everytime you finish a little section, it is incredibile how much it adds to the vessel. There is a lot of detail on this model. Definitely the most elaborately decorated French vessel created.
 
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#11
That is definitely a decorative ship and an impressive model. Lot of work there I am sure, but as you said, subassemblys add up into the finished model, its great when building to see it get more and more completed.

Tony
 

Donnie

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#15
Good luck with the Stern. This is a very challenging part. (at least it was for me - quite frustrating as the parts did not all fit good)

Donnie
 

GaryM

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Thanks everyone.
Donnie, you are so right. The stern on this one is very difficult because there are many different angles to deal with and try to get them all to connect. There will be at least 500 different parts on it. I will post more pictures after about 100 hours of work or when I finish the back portion. Seems like I am lucky to get 12 hours a week in on her.
 

Donnie

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#18
I really like that color scheme - especially the blue. Man - Wow - this is going to look nice - can't wait to see more. Very impressive to say.

Donnie
 

Donnie

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#19
I don't see any cannons pointing up. i think what you are referring to is the ends of the cannon that has that rear upward sweep to them. I assume this is the way this particular ship has its cannons made
 

GaryM

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#20
Thanks everyone.
This type of weapon was an anti-personal weapon that was light enough to move and fire onto the decks. It did not have a quoin to raise and lower the barrel. Probably this shape allowed for that feature when raking the decks.
I know I have seen them in one of my books, but could not find where. They were rare and not sure if any other country beside France used them.