HMY Fubbs (1724)

Uwek

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I think in one photo the rotary tool is shown, but I can not recognize the "wood burner".
Whic tool is it, and how you can do these fine burnings into the panel? Any info would be appreciated
 

Mike41

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Hi Uwe,
The wood burner is a Detail Master which is part of an electronic burning system. The tool is used by a lot of carvers of duck decoys, birds, small animals etc. I did some of that stuff when I was younger.
You simply transfer the design to a piece of wood and trace the pattern with the tool, it comes with several different tips for various details. After the pattern is transferred to the wood it is a guide for a surface carving and has tips for shading.
There are a lot of nice woodburning kits on the market look on Amazon there is a lot of tools and information there.
Mike IMG_1813.JPG IMG_1814.JPG
 

Mike41

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Hi Dave,
I am not planning on woodburning the outboard bulwark, I think a little of it goes a long way, the exterior will not be very elaborate Just keep it simple.
Mike
 

Mike41

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Poop Deck Breakfront:
This set of photos shows the poop deck breakfront installation. It has a nice covered stairway down to the great room. I added a staircase that was not on the drawings from the quarterdeck to the poop deck and things was looking good until I noticed the door to the great room opened into the forward poop deck beam. I checked the drawing, but it did not show any box framing for the stairwell. This is a few photos that show the framing modification, it worked out well. IMG_4782.JPG IMG_4783.JPG IMG_4784.JPG IMG_4785.JPG IMG_4786.JPG IMG_4787.JPG IMG_4788.JPG IMG_4789.JPG IMG_4790.JPG IMG_4791.JPG IMG_4792.JPG IMG_4793.JPG IMG_4794.JPG
 
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Hello Mike

Just found your great build on the Fubbs, I am truly astonished at the huge amount of very fine detail that you have added to your ship, seemingly so easy for you and also the very fast speed that you are building her. Here you are on the decking details on your build and I am still building Ribbing frames for my Oliver Cromwell. I do thank you very much for all of your great hints on just how to build such a great looking model. Just love your approach on using your Proxxon Mill to relief cutting of your stern decorations, this I must try.
Mike, got a question how would you approach cutting a Scarf Joint for the Keel? Been thinking this over for a few weeks now in preparation for cutting my Keel in a week or so, any helpful hints or pointers would be very much appreciated, ENJOY.

Regards Lawrence
 

Mike41

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Hi Lawrence,
I did not use a Scarf Joint in the Fubbs keel, but I will show you one I used in a different model.
I make patterns for each piece of the keel and use a scroll saw to cut out the two pieces as shown in the first photo. Then I use a vice to hold the keel and a file to remove the waste outside the outline as shown in the second and third photos. The scarf joints for the keel and keelson are show on the fourth photo, the fifth photo shows the glue up and the sixth photo shows the finished keel and keelson. This is old school but I like to cut joints this way.
Mike IMG_1751.JPG IMG_1761.JPG IMG_1762.JPG IMG_1763.JPG IMG_1803.JPG IMG_1808.JPG
 

Mike41

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Thanks Dave, the capstan and windlass can both used to weigh the anchors, I think they used the windlass for the anchor and the capstan with tackle to load the guns and provisions on board. This is just a guess, I could not find any info on why they would have both on board but if they didn’t need them they would not be there.
Mike
 

Mike41

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Planking continued:
This is a few more photos of the planking. I bought a large bag of rubber bands for this project they work great to control the amount of pressure on the planking. I also use balsa standoff blocks to protect the planks from dents. IMG_4869.JPG IMG_4870.JPG IMG_4871.JPG IMG_4873.JPG IMG_4874.JPG IMG_4875.JPG IMG_4876.JPG
 

Uwek

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Did you paint the planks blue before the installation? Than you have no possibility of a later surface sanding. On the other hand you have a better paint quality......was this the argument for your decision, to do it in this sequence?
 

Mike41

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Hi Uwe, yes, I painted the planks before installing them I am not a good painter I get paint all over, so this works better for me.
 
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