HMS Vanguard 1787 - Victory Models - 1:72

Peglegreg

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G'day arthur, I've just had a very enjoyable read through your build log,very nice work, I particularly like the way you have painted the stern, and your lighting looks great, a very nice model,

best regards John.
G'day Arthur
I also been reading (and I'm only half the through) your log and I havta say how great, not only your build, but your information is.
Havagooday
Greg
 

Peglegreg

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G'day Arthur
I've finished now and O'whattabeauty it was to read. Brilliant is another word not only for your log, but the model as well.
Havagooday
Greg
 

Uwek

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I am relatively new in the forum since some days, so I am making my homework and read the logs.....just went and read your log and I am realy impressed. Very clean and accurate work and like Greg mentioned also shown and explained in a very interesting and informative way.
Also positive to see, that the quality of this kit seems to be very good and you are making a high quality model out of it.....
 

Maarten

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Hi Arthur,

I have been looking on the lego roping machine but it was difficult to get the right parts from less then 3 sources. So I decided to order a small roping machine and a small serving machine from domanoff workshop in Belarus. Comments on these machines were very positive on Internet so I will be using these to not only serve ropes but also make them.

Regs Maarten
 

aew

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Thanks Uwe. There are one or two minor mistakes in the instructions and problems with the odd parts here and there but I'd rate the kit pretty highly.

Regs: It helps if you can beg, borrow, or steal parts from the children or grandchildren! :)
 

aew

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I decided to fit the lower stunsail booms next, but immediately ran into a problem – they don’t appear on the plans!
The mountings for them are provided in the form of photo etched parts, but there are no details of the booms themselves. There’s nothing complicated about them; I could make them the same diameter as the upper booms and the outer ends of them in this period was plain with a single hole drilled through (side to side) one diameter from the end. The inboard ends have a ferrule round them and a hook driven in the centre. The missing piece of information was how long should they be?
I checked the pictures on the box lid but failed to find any there or on the internet so I opted to make them just a bit longer than the channels,
After a bit of fabrication and a coat of ‘dull black’ paint, they were hung up to dry:

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I fitted the inboard brackets on the channels a long time ago, but I didn’t like the brackets for the outboard ends. They were a closed loop! So, time to make some new ones.
These were cut from a coil of bronze strip:

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The bronze took longer than brass to blacken, but it got there in the end. (That nail on the left went back in!)

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This is how the inboard end looks:
(A drop of superglue was applied to the bottom of the hook to discourage it from jumping out.)

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I can’t believe that the booms would have just been left resting on the aft brackets, so I lashed them in place:

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Job done?
Well not quite, as I’ve since found this picture on the front of the manual:

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Somewhat shorter than they should be!

That left three options:
  1. Leave them as they are and hope no one notices.
  2. Take them off and make some new ones.
  3. Extend the existing ones.
Option 1 was obviously the easiest but unfortunately there’s one person who will notice – guess who!
Option 2 was too much like hard work, so on with option 3:

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When I took that picture, the first two extensions were already fitted. This is the one on the fore port boom:

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After a little bit of sanding and a coat of paint, this is how they looked:

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This is the boom on the port main channel.

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I’ve still to fit the extensions on the starboard side, but I’ve now had some practice!
 

JPC

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Hey Arthur. Happy to meet you again. This model is even more facinating than your Gulnara, of which I remember I downloaded the pics for my personal documentation. What's next? The upcoming Bellona? The Stefano clipper? Whatever your choice, sign me in!
 
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JPC: I was about to post an update to this log when I spotted your post. My apologies for not responding much sooner!
I've not given any thought to what comes next; although at first glance Vanguard looks more or less complete, there are lots of small (and some not so small) jobs still on the 'to do' list. It won't be a large scale project though.
 
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It’s been a long time since the last update for various reasons, but some work did take place although it didn’t seem worth documenting until all the work was complete. The work in question was the ship’s anchors.

The first stage should have been routine, but there was a minor hitch. The anchor stocks were a rattle fit. The laser cut notches were too big for the castings so I glued pieces cut from a thin strip of wood in each of the holes.

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Next job was to make the anchor rings. The instructions say to bend the supplied 1mm wire round a 8mm dowel. There are four anchors so this is what I did:

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The observant among you will have noticed that although I’m about to cut through four pieces of wire, that’s only going to produce three rings!

Take 2:

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That’s as far as the instructions go; the anchors are shown fitted in this condition.

The first departure from the book was ‘Puddening’ the anchor rings; a similar process to serving a shroud or stay.
Here’s how the first one looked:

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The section of the ring that goes through the anchor should be left bare, but the hole in the anchor was actually larger than the puddening:

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The ring wasn’t going to stay in the correct position, so I opted to do the whole of the ring.
After filing the ends square and soldering them together, I just had a small section to complete:

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Oh, and I also had to repeat the job another three times:

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The second departure was to attach an anchor buoy. This turned out to be much more of a challenge than I was anticipating!
The job started well; use a pencil sharpener on the end of a piece of dowel to shape one half and then carve away at the other half until it falls off the dowel:

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That’s when the fun started!
I at first thought I could make up two identical ‘nets’ and fit one from each end. Not so, the second one weaves though the first one. It’s outside it at one end but inside it at the other end.
After several aborted attempts, I found a method that worked.
This is what it looked like with just the final two ends and the seizing to trim off:

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I’ve another of these to construct so I’ll take some pictures and try and explain later how it was done:

This next picture shows the lines attached to the buoy and how it attaches to the anchor:

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One more departure from the diagrams in the instructions, the anchor cable is shown simply passing through the anchor ring and seized back on itself. I’ve seen various pictures of ‘Anchor’ knots to connect the anchor cable to the anchor but these were apparently only used on small ships and up to about 1850 the cables on warships were ‘Clinched’ to the anchor ring.
This is an extract from James Lees – The Masting and Rigging of English Ships of War:

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And this is the finished anchor:

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