Fishknot's HMS Blandford Cross Section Build

didit

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Just a real quick note and a shout out to Didit, aka Dave Stevens for providing me with two of his cast cannons for my Blandford project. I received them today and they are very well made and detailed (which feeds my obsession). My lathe skills would not have resulted in cannons with this much detail and accuracy.

thanks for the kind review of the cannons Andy glad you liked them.
daves
 

Fishknots

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Blandford Group Build
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Oct 26, 2017
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Looks really nice Andy. I bought a couple of ebony pen blanks but I haven't tried to turn them yet. I know virtually nothing about using a wood lathe yet. I guess I will learn.
Mike, Thanks.

I have actually turned the two elm tree pumps and the mast already, each from birch dowels. Both were easy enough, but the thought of turning the two cannons wasn't sitting well with me. That's why I decided to purchase the castings from Dave.

Good luck with your turning adventure. Just go slow and you should be fine.

Andy
 

Fishknots

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Blandford Group Build
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UPDATE,

I have just about finished the elm and chain pumps for the hold. And I made the foreword wall of the well open so that the bases of each can be seen.

I made the working chamber of the chain pump (the inner of the two down shafts) from one piece of 3/16" dia wood dowel and 7/32" square brass tubing. The back case (inner shaft of the chain pump) was made entirely of the 7/32" square brass tubing. I soldered two straps to represent joints. I will apply a similar joints to the working chamber shaft as well.

I soldered the front and back plates of the lower sprocket wheel housings and then filled them with 2-part wood epoxy filler and sanded to the shape of the two plates. Before the wood filler dried, I took the round dowels of the working chamber shafts and impressed the end into the filler so that it could be inserted and glued in later.

The brass parts all received a coating of Jax brass black. The wooden parts of the entire chain pump apparatus will be paired with black or dark brown acrylic paint.

I turned the elm tree pumps to size from 1/2" dowels. These will be stained a medium dark brown and have brass strapping applied to imitate joints and stained black with the Jax blackening.

The difficulties that I am facing with the well and pumps is the installation of all of them and the decking under the chain pump cistern. It is a delicate balancing act to get the well in them glue in the pump shafts then the decking (insuring that there are openings to allow the chain pump shafts to come thru the deck. I will let you know how it turns out.

I have fabricated the chain pump handles from brass rod and brass tubing. They are ready to install once I start on the second deck.

I added a belaying pin to one of the shot locker hatches as a prop to keep it open. I will attempt to have some cannon shot visible thru that open hatch. At least that's the plan.

Here are the pics of my build progress:

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Fishknots

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Blandford Group Build
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Oct 26, 2017
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More work on the well area. Slow, but making progress (with all of the other things I have to do these last few months). I am able to work on it occasionally these days.

IMG_0783.jpg IMG_0792.jpg

I blackened all of the brass parts and used acrylic paints to blacken the wooden parts of the chain pump. I used acrylic washes to stain the elm tree pump shafts. I wrapped the elm tree pumps with black malleable steel wire that I had from a ship build 30 years ago. I don't remember where I got it, but it is in a spool and is very easy to shape, almost like lead. I used it to shape the straps around the elm tree pump shafts, then painted them black.

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I used the same acrylic wash technique to paint (or stain) the pump well inside and out. I sanded all of the wood down to 320 grit and then sprayed two coats of satin verithane over the entire pieces (well, elm tree pumps, wooden parts of the chain pump shafts. After they were all painted, I sprayed them with Testors Dull Coat. I wasn't real happy with the dull coat finish, it was still too shiny. I will probably use an air brush to apply a top coat of Model Master Flat Clear Acrylic. I have used this before and it has absolutely NO shine whatsoever. I want a dull finish on most of the wooden parts of the model, but I will allow the mast, deck and other facets of this build to shine a bit for an authentic look.

I had to remove the fore end of the pump well wall in order to slip the well enclosure in and around the elm and chain pump shafts. This end will be open in order to afford views of the interior of the pump well in order to display its contents. You can see one of the corner stations on the left of the pictures below that split apart when I detached the wall. It will be reinstalled after I have secured the pump shafts and stained the hold planking, mast step, etc.

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After I have completed the finish on the interior of the hold and installed the well and shafts, I will begin the fabrication of the main deck framing. In the future, I will be adding ballast stones and some cargo in the form of sacks and barrels, etc.

At this moment, I am working on the main mast. I have turned it and finish sanded it. I have a primer coat of gesso on it and will be painting it rather than staining the birch wood that it is made from. The grain on this particular piece of wood is large and looked to me out of scale. The bare mast is visible in the pictures below.

So I decided to paint the mast and give it the appearance of a grain true to the scale of the model. Hopefully I won't screw that up too badly.

More to follow...

HAPPY FOURTH!
 

Fishknots

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Blandford Group Build
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Haven't posted in a while, but here is an update...

I have painted the mast with washes of acrylic paint and placed straps on the mast from just below the lower deck level to the mast step. I have seen masts braced in this fashion on other boat reference photos, so I used some artistic license with their placement here. With the interior walls of the well and the elm tree pumps also painted with the same washes (different colors), they all look very natural installed next to each other. And then I added the chain pump shafts and the well really looked as though it was like that for years (or so I think).

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Now the problem I was then faced with was blackening the brass bands after they were installed onto the mast. I opted to do so after they were permanently installed onto the mast instead of before. Mistake. I totally forgot about Doc Blake's brass blackening with the hard-boiled eggs tutorial from several weeks ago and wish I had used that method instead. Oh well. I got staining around the brass rings onto the wood, but since I had sprayed a coat of satin polyurethane on the mast first, the staining wasn't too bad.

The photo below-left shows the mast installed before I attached the brass straps. The photo on the right shows the effect that the on-the-mast blackening, but I was able to remove most of it while still keeping the foot of the mast looking like it has been in the well for years (the color picked up by the camera is a bit darker than it actually is).

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Once I had gotten all of the well inside and out washed with acrylic, I began to work on the shot locker. In my research to find cannon scale shot that I could display in the side that has the open hatch, I realized that the cannon balls for this scale (1:32) were very close to the size of BB shot. I had an old box of steel BBs that were 4.5 mm in diamter. I was actually able to place one in the open end of the cannon barrel that Didit (aka Dan Stevens) made for me!

I took a piece of black card stock and folded it up so that I could glue it to the inside of the open shot locker. That way I didn't have to completely fill both halves of the locker with BB shot. It would have added quite a bit of unnecessary weight to the model.

Once the card stock "pocket" was dry, I filled it with as many BBs as I thought looked right. I ended up with exactly 50 that fit in there just right. I took those 50 out and placed them into a blackening solution and swirled them around until they were nice and black. I rinsed them with water and set them out to dry. When dry, I poured them into my newly created compartment in the shot locker. Then to make them a permanent part of the locker, I poured a runny version CNA glue over all of the balls and let them dry. Once dry I gave the well-shot locker a little shake and found the some had not been hit with the glue, so I repeated the gluing. Once I was satisfied that all of the balls were not going anywhere, I sprayed them with Testor's Dull-Coat.

A word of caution though...when you drip or pour in a thin CA glue (and by thin, I mean a glue that has no additives to thicken it. It is just a regular super glue consistency). Keep in mind that the glue will seep down through the wood of your shot locker and through it and out the bottom. So be careful how much you apply and where you apply it. Keep the locker-well assembly upright so that there is no seepage through the sides of your work.

There may be a different manner in which to glue in the balls, but this was the fastest one I came up with.

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The below picture shows the newly installed cannon balls in the open side of the shot locker with a belaying pin propping the hatch open.

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After the Well-locker was complete, I glued it into place in the hold.

Thanks for viewing my build log.

Andy
 

Fishknots

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Blandford Group Build
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It is always a pleasure to read your build logs and admire your work Andy.
Thanks Mike!

I have been busy with other non-ship build related tasks the last two or three months so it has been hard to sit down and work on the Blandford. I have made a bit of progress that I will share hopefully this weekend.

Andy
 

Fishknots

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Blandford Group Build
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August 25, 2018
Build Update...

I have continued with the lower deck by installing the planking, creating the holes for the chain pump and elm tree pump shafts and the mast.

The middle planks are of walnut and the others are of basswood. The caulking was made from black card stock placed in between each plank. The card stock is cut slightly larger so that it extends above the edges of the planks. Then the planks and the caulking are scraped and sanded flat. I was very please at how uniform these all came out and gave a very believable impression of caulked deck planks. I got the idea for this method from this site:

http://www.wicksteedparkmbc.com/deck-planking.html

The process for planking around the elm tree shafts and the chain pump shafts was no easy one, but I went slow and checked the fit as I went. The same for the mast opening.

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The mast wedge and cover were made from styrene strips (I know it isn't wood or brass, but I don't have the means to turn either very accurately). These will be painted a warm black similar to the chain pump cistern.

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This is the final placement of the elm tree and chain pump shafts through the deck (dry fit shown). I will add some fittings at the bases of each pump shaft where it penetrates the deck to simulate a brass fitting that would have been used. These too will be from styrene plastic and painted black.

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I used bamboo chopsticks cut down and then pulled through a dowel shaper to fabricate the deck nails. The drill size for those was a #60 and the draw plate size was 42. They were all glued in with carpenter's glue. I removed the pump shafts, mast and chain pump cistern and sanded the entire deck flat. The card stock I used for the deck caulking came out beautifully.

I will leave the one side of the deck un-planked to reveal the deck beam construction.

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I will be fabricating and installing the pump dales after I have put a finish on the deck and glued in the chain pump. I will not glue in the elm tree pump at this point because I have to fabricate the spouts that are located on this deck and the spouts and handles above the main deck. Leaving the shafts unsecured for now makes that process easier for now. I may adjust my approach to that as I go, but don't intend to glue in the elm tree pump until I have the main deck beams fabricated and installed.

Additional photos of this phase of my build:

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More to come.....

Andy
 
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