Donald McKay

Joined
Jun 19, 2013
Messages
203
Points
18

#21
The largest sphere of interest is by collectors. Viewing figures and the occasional "like" don't mean a great deal if no-one says anything, but speaking for myself, I don't get any satisfaction at all from "playing to an empty theatre" which is why I have discontinued build logs, not just here - but everywhere. In fact at the moment, I am considering giving it up altogether, and just taking up plan drawing for my own amusement. The main reason is that after the Gulf Stream model was wrecked, I am not prepared to send them out by courier any more, so my outlets are now reduced to personal collection, and in the past, I have made too many to keep. My best customers were mainly in the USA, Europe and the Far East. I am already getting pressure from collectors, but when a hobby becomes a chore, it is time to give up! It makes a pleasant change that there is now some discussion taking place, but even so, it is very limited, and will soon die out! Afraid that kits have taken over, and nothing will ever reverse that. I expect the 3D printers will eventually supercede the kit - progress, I suppose.
Bob
Interesting...Robert. I found this same situation happening to me concerning my custom made miniature lighthouses....after one was destroyed being delivered to the East coast...I was troubled and kept local. Namely the collector sought them out and interest diminished to the point I gave up. I have toyed with starting up a limited production...but my clippers keep me satisfied currently. As you mentioned...it was becoming a chore...to design, coming up with a unique setting and name...etc. they are an luring subject, but I needed more then that to keep me personally emotionally interested.

Rob
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jun 19, 2013
Messages
203
Points
18

#23
Up to date more than 300 people viewed this topic, several posted already comments and several more made "likes" -> there is interest in these ships, but not everybody is building models of them
I agree....there is a fascination with *Tall ships*...possibly a childhood..romantic one, but when pressed...,the complexity of the rigging and sails tends to distract folks from follow through. It is a fact that sailing ship models(from the manufacturers point of view are the least finished models once begun. They require loads of patience and a real aptitude/skill at figuring and dealing with the intricacies' of modern cargo carrying vessels rigging.

One reason why I tend to build my clippers into a diorama....is to draw the viewer into the real world realm and day to day activity of the vessel being modeled. If I can introduce the viewer into an actual event in the life of the vessel being modeled, it then stops being just another static model, but one that actually had a history...and hopefully by this, the viewer will, themselves be drawn into the hobby.

Robert does it very well with depicting his miniature vessels in active roles...such as open water sailing...ice flows....etc

Rob
 

Uwek

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Moderator
Blandford Group Build
Joined
Dec 25, 2017
Messages
4,311
Points
113

Location
Vienna, Austria
#24
I agree....there is a fascination with *Tall ships*...possibly a childhood..romantic one, but when pressed...,the complexity of the rigging and sails tends to distract folks from follow through. It is a fact that sailing ship models(from the manufacturers point of view are the least finished models once begun. They require loads of patience and a real aptitude/skill at figuring and dealing with the intricacies' of modern cargo carrying vessels rigging.

One reason why I tend to build my clippers into a diorama....is to draw the viewer into the real world realm and day to day activity of the vessel being modeled. If I can introduce the viewer into an actual event in the life of the vessel being modeled, it then stops being just another static model, but one that actually had a history...and hopefully by this, the viewer will, themselves be drawn into the hobby.

Robert does it very well with depicting his miniature vessels in active roles...such as open water sailing...ice flows....etc

Rob
Hallo Rob,
I fully understand your explanations and underline them.

I can tell you my thoughts about tall ship models - but only especially related to my personal subjective modelling:
In principle I like to build in bigger scale my models, especially because you can make and include more details of the vessel - this is my personal taste.
So scale would be 1:48 up to maybe 1:64
Like you wrote in your post "the complexity of the rigging and sails tends to distract folks from follow through" is for me the problematic side of these kind of ships:
The modern sailing boats have much much more metal parts included in the rigging, which makes these kind of ships problematic or more complicate to build.
I have the problem with the metal parts, soldering, welding, mass production of these parts......

I would really like to build one, the hull planking works are easier, because of the beautiful lines, also deck furniture easier, no or very reduced decorations, means no carving necessary - and most important they are beautiful - BUT - if somebody could produce all these metal parts?

This is my personal point of view - so Bob: to build in small scales to reduce the details is not a solution for me
 

shipbuilder

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 30, 2012
Messages
571
Points
63

Location
Great Britain
#25
I have always found it much easier to make miniatures because the rigging is much simplified by the use of wire, with no knots at all. I can put half a dozen backstays on in less than five minutes. Another of my peculiarites is that I have always found that making small parts from metal is a lot easier than wood because it is stronger. Never having had much patience, practically forced me onto miniatures! :)
Bob
14 (Large).JPG
 
Joined
Jun 19, 2013
Messages
203
Points
18

#26
I have always found it much easier to make miniatures because the rigging is much simplified by the use of wire, with no knots at all. I can put half a dozen backstays on in less than five minutes. Another of my peculiarites is that I have always found that making small parts from metal is a lot easier than wood because it is stronger. Never having had much patience, practically forced me onto miniatures! :)
Bob
View attachment 53292
Robert...your miniatures are absolutely supreme with detail...I'm completely enamored with your ability at this scale. Using photocopied material.
Ding...spot on.

Rob
 

shipbuilder

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 30, 2012
Messages
571
Points
63

Location
Great Britain
#27
On the Facebook group, quite a number of them are building highly detailed models at 100 feet to 1 inch, so mine are not all that small. It is not, however, the scale that I am receommending, as much as getting into the far more interesting merchant ship model. I find it odd that whenever a whaler is mentioned, there are comments about how awful it was killing wales etc, but it was no different than a modern trawler scooping up 50 tons of cod, and pouring them into the freezer hold to die. And warships, specifically designed to kill and destroy, are always considered noble and wonderful subjects for models - give me a tramp steamer, passenger liner or steel four-masted barque any day! Welcome to the Facebook group, and hope to see some of your excellent clippers arriving, to help even the balance between sail and steam.
Bob
17 (Large).JPG
 
Last edited:

wesmaine

Active Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2018
Messages
74
Points
33

Location
Moving From NE, Ohio to SE, ME
#29
The largest sphere of interest is by collectors. Viewing figures and the occasional "like" don't mean a great deal if no-one says anything, but speaking for myself, I don't get any satisfaction at all from "playing to an empty theatre" which is why I have discontinued build logs, not just here - but everywhere. In fact at the moment, I am considering giving it up altogether, and just taking up plan drawing for my own amusement. The main reason is that after the Gulf Stream model was wrecked, I am not prepared to send them out by courier any more, so my outlets are now reduced to personal collection, and in the past, I have made too many to keep. My best customers were mainly in the USA, Europe and the Far East. I am already getting pressure from collectors, but when a hobby becomes a chore, it is time to give up! It makes a pleasant change that there is now some discussion taking place, but even so, it is very limited, and will soon die out! Afraid that kits have taken over, and nothing will ever reverse that. I expect the 3D printers will eventually supercede the kit - progress, I suppose.
Bob
I here you there ...
 
Top