Constructo Prince de Neufchâtel - My first POB ship

Dicas

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#21
After the inside planking of the bulwarks complete it was time to add the stern transom. The piece supplied in the kit did not fit no matter how hard I tried. Don't ask me what kind of wood that is, it is the kind of "available wood". It fitted, so glued in place it was...

DSC09024.JPG


The inside planking of the tramson gave me some matter of thought, I was born near the sea, there were a some naval yards that made mainly fishing boats and as a boy I visited the yards some times. I remember that the planking of the transom was made of curved planks, following the curve of the deck and just for fun and as I thought it would be more real, I tried to do the same in tne model.

Glueing two planks top to top gave me the necessary width to make the curved planks. How acurate they are, I don't know, as I said before I ignore everything in this ship except that it really existed and some other details of lesser importance...

Anyway, here they are:

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and in place (and the rear ports opened)

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In the photo the union between the two planks shows a little, but if is very amplified and they are hardly noticeable.

I must say I like the effect.

It is all for now.

Regards

JL
 

Aginvicta

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#22
The planking looks good. There is no harm in adding extras or experimenting with things. The vast majority of people seeing your ship will just see a great looking model ship,
Cheers Andy
 

Dicas

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#27
How don't know if this happens with every kit or just this one, although the Charles W. Morgan has exactly the same problem, but the stern is the less documented part of the model, what is a problem because I can see that is one of the mosf difficult to get right. Some photos or sketches should be very helpfull if provided, as it is a lot of guess work. Thinking ahead can help but with my short experience a lot of trial and error must be envolved.

I had absolutely no idea how the damm thing should look like I only know that if I followed the instructions I would end up with a pretty mess.

Constructo and Artesania Latina, (the ones I know) should be more careful with the instructions and give useful views of what the finished thing should look like. At least have some more consideration for the fellow who buys their kits.

As things were I had to invent my interpretation of what the transom should look like, it is not flat that I can see.

I think that the piece that I added to the transom allows it to al least to look real.


Correcting some faults in the transom.

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Work on the part to mend the stern

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In place and with the exterior planking.

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adding the lower (darker) planking to the stern

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... with the curved planks. I can't figure straight planks there, maybe I'm wrong, but it looks much better to me.

Maybe I'm being picky...

Regards

JL
 

Dicas

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#28
For a 'beginner', your work is pretty dang nice!!! Are you sure about that word 'beginner'? LOL
Thanks for the cumpliment... Well I have some experience in planes, gliders, dolls houses and plastic. But this is my first wooden ship kit, apart from a Drakkar that was a simpler task.

Beginners luck, maybe?

Regards

JL
 

Dicas

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#29
Hello

Back from a small vacation. I don't know what is happening in your countries, bur here in Portugal we are having a strange summer and even in Algarve, in the south, the temperatures are lower than the usual by some 8-10 ºC.

Back to my Prince, it was time to begin the external planking, by the upper plank. The wood was fair, ayous, whatever that is, easy to work, sands well and gives a good finish.

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After the upper plankings in place, I opted for shaping the galant rails, what proved to be a major challenge since I was supposed to shape a 6x2mm strip of Manzonia around the width. I was unable to do that, if it is easy to bend the strip around the 2mm, I didn't find a way of bending it around the 6mm. No way.

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I tried my hot air gun with the soaked plank but I found it impossible. Manzonia is not that easy to bend.

The only way I figured to do what was intended, was to split the strips lenghtwise in 3 2x2 strips, bend them and glue them together using a jig

DSC09063.JPG DSC09067.JPG DSC09069.JPG DSC09070.JPG DSC09071.JPG

After all it ended much better than I thought, after sanded and in place it turned out very decent,

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The picture is much larger than life and the tiny separation between the strips does not show to the naked eye.

I was pleased with the final result.

Can anyone tell me a method (besides amonia) to bend a 6x2 strip around the 6mm? I'd like very much to hear any different solution than mine.

JL
 
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