Bluenose by Scientific

Fright

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#1
I stumbled upon this kit on Ebay and the price was right! I thought I would try my hand at my 1st wooden kit and went with a solid hull model. I noticed that this schooner seemed to have a lot of builds and information online. My wife was kind enough to purchase Frank Mastini's book "Ship Modeling Simplified", which I'm very grateful to have as a reference. When it arrived, whoever originally owned it had already adhered the two decks to the hull and did not make a clean cut in doing so. They had also cut through some of the pieces and some pieces of wooden parts were missing. This explains the 'great deal.

No worries - I was lucky to pick up some basswood strips and sheets at Joann's and started in on this project. First, I used different grades of sandpaper to smooth out the hull. I then used Elmer's wood putty to fill in gaps and dents in both the hull and keel. Then re-sanded, primed, re-sanded and primed. I then went on to shape the rudder to the hull and primed as well. I tried to clean up the cut mark on the deck and stained the deck with Cabot's Autumn Glow stain & sealer.\

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Fright

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#2
Here is the deck after staining. I wanted a warm, darker color to contrast with the white/grey fittings on deck. I have added my side rails and stancions at this point. *I realized that there should have been more stancions than what I have, but the plans to this kit were very vague. It was not until I started to look closely at other models that I noticed the difference. My scuppers are also not an 'accurate' depiction but it is what it is.

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Joined
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Sutton. Ontario, Canada
#3
Hello Fright

Golly but you sure did make a great find, your Bluenose sure will be a ship that you will be proud of for many years to come. One little word of advice is, please do take your time. Shipbuilding is not a job but a hobby. And if for some reason what you see is not pleasing to your eye then, by all means, rebuild it. Your ship will last a lifetime and maby many years after that if you do your best.

My first ship was also the Bluenose, given to me by my Admiral many years ago, oh I did make my share of mistakes in building her but she still sits on the shelf in our living room, as proud as ever, ENJOY.

Regards Lawrence
 

Fright

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#4
Lawrence - many thanks for taking a look and your advice on taking one's time. I also refer to the Bluenose Practicum from time to time to see some differences between the kits and trying to add more detail to this kit. Working with wood seems to give one a feel that one is really building a ship. It's different but I think it is more forgiving than plastic models.
 

Fright

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#5
The one-page plans were a little unclear as to how to attach the rails, stancions and monkey rails to the hull. I finally got some advice from two other modelers and I got them in place. A little more putty work to hide the seams; shaped the rudder; more primer and masked off the hull for her paint job.

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Fright

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#6
After painting the hull, I started in with the main cabin. Also made the pintles and gudgeons from brass strips and attached to the rudder. Drilled a hole for a pin into top of rudder to set into the hull for better stability. Our daughter and grandson came to visit with us and the little one was fascinated with my ships. I let him help me on the two dories. I let him glue the seats into the dories and let him dip the thread into 50/50 white glue/water mix for my rope coils. He's now my First Mate!

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Fright

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#7
Proceeded to make the dory stands out of strips of basswood and stained them. Worked on the forward hatch; added the forward stove vent to the deck; pinrails in place and worked on the Samson post and bowsprit. Added the two hatches and main pinrail to the deck. The eye bolts are 2mm pins from HobbyLobby painted flat black. Flat white and light grey was used on cabins and hatches. Placed grating in front of forward hatch and used clear nail polish to finish. The windlass is sitting in place (not glued) to check positioning.

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Donnie

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#10
Oh - BTW - never heard of scientific as far as boxed kits go. Interesting. Is this the only boat / ship they have? The young one is very fortunate to have someone like you mentor him and how him. I never enjoyed that when growing up.

Donnie
 

DougW

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Apr 24, 2017
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Wisconsin, USA
#11
Fright,
Welcome to the Bluenose club. Yours looks great especially with the helping hand. Wish i had mine as far along as yours. The paint job is wonderful.
Hoping to work on mine this weekend but it is not looking good.
Doug
 

Fright

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#12
Donnie - Scientific is no longer around. It looks like they were popular in the late 50's or 60's. They produced a number of ships and planes including the USS Constitution, Thermopylae, the Sea Witch and Cutty Sark clipper ship to name a few. I found my Bluenose at a garage sale. You can still find these for sale on Ebay from time to time.
 
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Fright

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#13
Worked on the back part of schooner. Finished the wheel house; the main cabin and grating; added my barrels and supports; masts are only in for fitting and positioning. Also added windlass engine compartment; chain box; windlass awaiting chain to be attached.

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Fright

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#16
Doug - pretty close measurements! She measures 15.5" from bow to stern and 23" in total length from end of main boom to the front tip of bowsprit. 17" high from keel to top of main mast.
 

Fright

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#17
Here's what happens when one is in a hurry when drilling. I was working on main mast when SNAP - the drill bit broke and proceeded to go right though my left index nail and into the finger. This is after I cleaned up the blood from the hole! I also realized that I had put the top masts on backwards! Thank goodness for Nail Polish Remover and no breakage in having to pull apart the masts. Corrected the mistakes and finished off the two masts.

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Fright

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#18
Finally got around to installing the foremast and main mast. Tried to add as much of the lines to masts before I placed them into the deck. I then used a level and protractor to help center the masts to the deck. Added a slight tilt to stern on masts.
 

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Fright

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#19
Did a little more work on deck detail. Painted the belaying pins black. Added my deadeyes and tackle to sides of ship.

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