Weathering Wood

This forum gives our members a chance to share ideas, techniques and results of super detailing their models. This will not be limited to ship models as the techniques used to super detail models typically spans all types of models, not just ships. It also gives our members the chance to showcase their modeling prowess , regardless of whether their best work was a ship, plane, car, train, etc.
DaveC
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Weathering Wood

Postby DaveC » Mon Mar 06, 2017 1:00 pm

Model railroaders put a lot of weathering detail into almost everything. I am no exception.
But, ships are a different animal. Would any ship in the age of sail, be allowed to get to a point where paint would be cracked and peeling? Would iron work be allowed to rust?
If so, where would it be seen on a sailing ship?
I ask because every model sail ship built, that I have seen, all look like they are fresh off the ways or the fitters.

Perhaps never allowed to get to the point I list, maybe paint fade and wear and tear?
Yes, I know steel ships are allowed to get looking pretty rough. I have seen some here.
But again, the sea worthiness of sailing ships was a prime concern of captains.
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GemmaJF
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Re: Weathering Wood

Postby GemmaJF » Mon Mar 06, 2017 1:35 pm

My current project was according to legend burnt, sunk, and raised again. The Black Pearl is more than just weathered, it was toast lol. So I'm weathering away during the build.

I've already decided when I build the Bounty she will be as she was at Pitcairn Island. Years at sea and the subject of a mutiny, it is not likely that she would have looked like she had just left the shipyard.

It is all a matter taste. I appreciated a clean build of a model just as much as seeing a weathered one. I just prefer in general to build weathered and 'lived in' looking models myself. I find it easier at larger scales so 1:50 for ships is an open invitation for me to do some weathering.
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GemmaJF
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Re: Weathering Wood

Postby GemmaJF » Mon Mar 06, 2017 1:43 pm

Just to add Dave, consider the ship's history.

Some ships of the line may never have left port unless for a specific engagement. In which case they may have been totally pristine throughout much of their life.

Other ships had eventful and long voyages and ended their days leaking so badly they were robbed of any useful materials and then unceremoniously burnt.

Weathering is about time, place and likely history of the subject.

Gong back to my background with model planes, a heavily weathered Airbus is not going to work for me, but a battle worn WWII fighter is a different thing. I'm sure this can be applied to ship models in the same sort of way.
Last edited by GemmaJF on Mon Mar 06, 2017 3:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Current Build: ZHL Black Pearl 1:50

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Re: Weathering Wood

Postby shipwright101 » Mon Mar 06, 2017 1:49 pm

weathering looks good in dioramas of ship wrecks or working boats. There is a lot of work to get all the subtle coloration
like in there photos

http://modelshipbuilder.com/e107_plugin ... 27059.last


the reason for the link is because I can up load just about any image with no problem at the MSB forum, here I have to resize and I end up with postage size image or huge low res images so a link is fast and easy.
DaveC
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Re: Weathering Wood

Postby DaveC » Mon Mar 06, 2017 2:23 pm

Yes, weathering can be a lot of work. But, if done correctly, the effect is truly amazing.

Perhaps the question should be...wear and tear?

Dave
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GemmaJF
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Re: Weathering Wood

Postby GemmaJF » Mon Mar 06, 2017 3:29 pm

PS Dave, I referred to you as Paul above, it is the standard avatar, it gets me confused lol. ;-)

I have heard elsewhere from those that build ship models with an eye to selling them that they avoid weathering. This might be why we do not see much of it in ship models as it is the pristine models that sell more easily. I'm not building with selling in mind, so will do whatever suits me at the time.
Current Build: ZHL Black Pearl 1:50

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Researching for POB scratch build : HMS Ferret 1:48 (1711)

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Re: Weathering Wood

Postby shipwright101 » Tue Mar 07, 2017 10:27 am

Model ships seems to begin and end with the Admiralty model, these are the ultimate in model ship building. The model ship was regarded as a work of fine art to show craftsmanship and carving skills also to show a proposed ship design. Needless to say these models were very clean and perfect in every detail, you would not want to present a weather beaten or model looking like it just came from a battle. Your end goal is to sell this ship so you want it looking like a pieces of art. This style carries to this day
A model ship put into a diorama is a totally different genera here the model can be weather beaten damaged or whatever the builder wants.

Back years ago Harold Hahn put carved people on ship models he referred to as admiralty style and got a lot of back lash from NRG members saying it was degrading to put figures on a model. But he built a shipyard diorama and figures were fine. it all comes down to the genera your working in.
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GemmaJF
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Re: Weathering Wood

Postby GemmaJF » Tue Mar 07, 2017 12:32 pm

Interesting post, that gives me a lot of insight. I was aware of admiralty models, but not so much of the strong feelings that there is a tradition to follow, particularly if building from a kit. I've seen other things said, that ships on stands should not have sails, which is a bit like thinking they should not have figures unless in a diorama I guess. I can almost see a ship in itself as a diorama, without the surrounding diorama if that makes any sense and get that feeling from the first image. Glad I can just be an anarchistic newbie. ;-)
Current Build: ZHL Black Pearl 1:50

Next Up: Billing Boats Bounty 1:50

Researching for POB scratch build : HMS Ferret 1:48 (1711)

Projects: Arduino Lighting Project

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