M V STORM

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kiwibob
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M V STORM

Post by kiwibob » Fri Feb 12, 2016 9:24 pm

Hi All,
Here is my latest creation
MV STORM
Built 1961 by Scott and Sons Bowling for Canterbury Steam Shipping Co New Zealand
Length = 214.8 ft X 32 ft X 16.8 ft
Line Drawings from publication Canterbury Coasters by Gavin McLean on behalf of the NZ Ship and Marine Society. ISBN09597834-0-7
Model scale = 1/300
Build time about 3 months but had a break in the middle to build another ship
Finished Storm today 11th Feb 2016
A couple of bits of interest the 6 cargo winches are 6 mm X 6 mm all hand built, the anchor chain is at 40 links per inch. Ex model railway suppliers
The anchor winch is also hand built 7x7 mm. All the vents I have had to make.
This is one ship that has been a joy to build so now looking into the next piece of NZ history
Attachments
MV-Storm-1.jpg
MV-Storm-1.jpg (82.39 KiB) Viewed 1477 times
MV-Storm-2.jpg
MV-Storm-2.jpg (68.71 KiB) Viewed 1477 times
MV-Storm-3.jpg
MV-Storm-3.jpg (92 KiB) Viewed 1477 times

shipbuilder
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Re: M V STORM

Post by shipbuilder » Sat Feb 13, 2016 2:47 am

Very nice, and that is a good scale to work to - not too small!
Bob

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eric61
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Re: M V STORM

Post by eric61 » Tue Feb 16, 2016 10:22 pm

Hi Bob, another impressive model, any history surrounding this ship?
The booms, are they carved or did you cut and paste (so to speak)?

Someone commented not too long ago that no one criticizes models, well, I'm going to start the ball rolling. On the bow picture your paintwork is a bit rough, shaky hand or an oversight? BTW can't fault anything else, Oh, if you don't retract your ball pen the nib will dry out. (hahaha) OK, had another look and it is a pencil, my bad.

Sorry for the following digress. My father was in the merchant navy, mid forties to mid fifties and finally finished up as steward on the MV Asturias transporting "ten pounders" to Australia. Unfortunately he can't remember the names of the earlier ships, his records were lost somewhere. On one trip from Canada laden with timber, should have take six weeks but ended up taking three months, engine broke down all the time. In the Atlantic with no engine they were hit by a storm and the timber, below and above deck shifted, they limped into the Bristol Channel and near Cardiff had to let the deck timber roll overboard because the ship was listing so heavily, tugs rounded the timber up, they had to offload the internal timber onto a barge because the ship could not berth.

Once again sorry for the 'off topic' story
Regards
Eric
Cook's Endeavour - current,
Sovereign of the Seas - current (deAgostini)
In queue: Marina II Fishing Boat by Artesania Latina
In queue: Mayflower by Model Shipways

kiwibob
Petty Officer Third Class
Petty Officer Third Class
Posts: 54
Joined: Fri Jun 07, 2013 3:13 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: M V STORM

Post by kiwibob » Wed Feb 17, 2016 2:22 am

Hi Eric,
There is no real history except she became part of Portland fleet and was painted a blue green colour. Re the paint job I agree but thats what happens when you use a 100 mm macro lens, bear in mind the name on the bow is 1.5 mm high.
The booms are 3 pieces of aluminium with a brass swivel all pined to work, also the masts are also aluminium as well the radar was made from bits of plastic. The hull is solid clear pine (no nots). So whats next I have started a schooner and am just setting up a small steamer passenger / cargo coastal ship. I also have two ships I havnt shown as yet but will leave that for a later date in a month or so.

Cheers
Bob

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