Treenail

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GaryM
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Treenail

Post by GaryM » Fri Mar 02, 2012 8:47 pm

On wooden ships, wooden pegs were driven in to hold the planks on at each frame . The external planking tree nail was only 1 1/2" in diameter. They were driven in flush with the planking. These would be almost invisible on most models. At 1:75 scale, this would be the size of a number 76 drill bit. If you feel you would like these, the easiest method would be to use an ultra fine brown pen using a light touch. On a painted model, they would not be visible.
As you go back in history, treenails were a maximum of inches. I believe that this size were used in ships that were built for ramming. I have never seen any documentation for a vessel concerning the size of its treenails. Only a general reference indicating the sizes used.
For those using mm, the treenail would be 38 mm on the full sized vessel..
Last edited by GaryM on Thu Sep 10, 2015 12:26 pm, edited 3 times in total.
Happy modeling,
Gary Maple

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Current build: Sergal Sovereign of the Seas
In Que: Sergal: Cutty Sark and Amerigo Vespucci; Billings Titanic
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JeanPierre
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Re: Treenail

Post by JeanPierre » Mon Feb 25, 2013 11:07 am

Ah treenails: the wooden ship modeller's obsession. Just like rivets were the obsession of plastic airplane modellers in the sixties. An items some modellers spend weeks on, and which very seldom look quite OK scalewise: often too large (just like the rivets on the airplanes were) or too dark, or not on the same level (happens when one sands two different pieces of wood together (pegs made of toothpike sticks or bamboo items). They are also often made with an expensive jeweler's gauge. I made mine with a sewing needle (not with a pin which is not sharp enough). But I admit I made the mistake to apply wood sealant just after that. That filled the tiny holes so they were hardly visible after that. I think I should hav put some light brown pastel powder before. But I did not dare as I have never used this technique before.

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Donnie
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Re: Treenail

Post by Donnie » Wed May 08, 2013 9:51 am

If I remember on both the Sultana Colonial Schooner and my present Trinidad, I just used a tiny pin vise bit and made the holes - did not fill them. What I did was afterwards of making the holes, I sanded the deck (which filled the holes with the sanded wood powder) then I put a light coat of Satin Polyurethane on it which simulated treenails just right (for my purpose).

I have found that Satin Polyurethane is really good, as even though at first, it puts a very wet darkish finish at first, several days later, that finish will be gone and it will look natural again.

Donnie
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