HMS Victory, 1:98, Mantua Kit No. 776

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newmansa01
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2017 2:18 am
Location: Columbus, OH

HMS Victory, 1:98, Mantua Kit No. 776

Postby newmansa01 » Wed Feb 01, 2017 3:13 pm

This is the beginning of my build log for the HMS Victory. I 'laid the keel' on Jan. 7, 2017 and am nearly one month in as I write this. I've taken a good number of photos, which I will begin posting as soon as I have a chance to 'downsize' them for uploading. For now, here's one depicting where I'm at now, except that I've just finished building the stern and will be attaching it soon.
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Building HMS Victory, 1:98 Scale
newmansa01
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2017 2:18 am
Location: Columbus, OH

Re: HMS Victory, 1:98, Mantua Kit No. 776

Postby newmansa01 » Wed Feb 01, 2017 4:50 pm

A little background on this kit: I purchased it this year with some extra Christmas money. I've always wanted to build a wooden ship model, and decided this is the year I'm going to do it. I've built tons of plastic model car, boat, airplane, spacecraft, etc. kits in my youth, but haven't built any models in quite a few years. I have pretty good detail woodworking skills and a good compliment of tools, too. One of the most useful so far has been my scroll saw, as I've spent many hours already cutting out the keel, bulkhead frames, and the timbers and beams to construct the stern framework.
I stumbled across this kit in a hobby store in Columbus (Hobbyland, Graceland Shopping Center) by sheer luck. From my research, I was beginning to think I may not be able to afford to buy the sort of kit I was looking to build, as I was seeing prices upwards of $400-$500 for many of them. And the few other wooden kits this store offered were actually more expensive than this one, despite being quite a bit more simple and smaller. This one was in a box that looked very old--the copyright on the kit is 1971(!) and it looks like it was actually made in 1980. I have no idea why this kit was for sale on the shelves of Hobbyland in 2017. The owner speculated it may have come in from an estate sale or something.
All I knew was this was an INCREDIBLY good deal! You could tell by picking up the box that it was probably a quality kit because it was HEAVY to pick up. I asked to open the box before completing my purchase, and both the owner and I were sort of blown away by the contents. All the wood parts are laser etched onto sheets of varying thickness plywood--either limewood, walnut, or some other very hard wood. All the small metal parts, netting for side railing, rigging ropes, etc. were in individual packets. The 13 full-size plan sheets actually had handwritten numbers (#1 through #13) written on the backs of the folded sheets. Rather than instructions, they are out and out plans of the ship, with all parts acurately printed at 1:1 scale on the sheets, unless otherwise noted. That way, if I ever break any pieces, it will be a simple matter to make another one from scratch to replace it.
I've cut out each of the bulkhead frames and attached them to the keel as I get ready to start putting down decking on the lower decks. This is an exercise mostly for my own practice, since they will be visible only to a very small extent if I proceed with cutting out the gun ports and leaving them open on the lower decks. The kit doesn't provide enough cannons to do this, so I'll have to buy some more, and modify the hull by cutting the openings and making open gun ports. Anyways, because of that I'm not using planking on the lower decks and have purchased some 1/32" basswood plywood sheet to cut it from. This will give me some practice before I get to the upper (visible) decks.
One unique feature of this kit, which you will see more when I get a chance to upload more pictures, is a very stout 'T' beam running the length of the ship for extra structural support. It's made from two pieces of solid wood (about 1/8"x3/4") to be fastened together as a 'T'. Being an engineer, I went beyond just glueing the two mating surfaces together. I also added about 8 small brass screws through the center of the 'crossbar' of the tee. Glue can't be relied on completely to provide the shear strength between the two surfaces when subjected to bending forces. But the metal screws will provide that strength and allow the two pieces to act 'compositely' and provide a great deal of rigidity in the finished model. I can already tell how sturdy this ship will be when completed. As I add decking to tie the bulkhead frames together, it will become very stout indeed. I shouldn't have to worry much about it getting broken when it's finished. (NOTE: I tried to attach a photo showing the T-beam but it wouldn't upload. It's 179Kb and 1000x750px. It seems to meet the size criteria for uploading...)
Building HMS Victory, 1:98 Scale
newmansa01
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2017 2:18 am
Location: Columbus, OH

Re: HMS Victory, 1:98, Mantua Kit No. 776

Postby newmansa01 » Wed Feb 01, 2017 4:57 pm

I'll try to post the photo I referred to in my last post. This shows the T-beam and the framing in the Bow area.
Building HMS Victory, 1:98 Scale
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Donnie
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Re: HMS Victory, 1:98, Mantua Kit No. 776

Postby Donnie » Fri Feb 03, 2017 2:25 pm

That is a very well built intricate frame. What image / photo program are you using to compress your images?
Donnie
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