Rhino CAD

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GemmaJF
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Rhino CAD

Post by GemmaJF » Sat May 06, 2017 6:36 am

Having spent some time catching up with the published tutorials and what people have been getting up to in CAD I thought it worth mentioning Rhinoceros.

Rhino falls neatly between an expensive AutoCAD license and software such as TurboCAD

Perhaps not cheap at € 1,695 but certainly much more affordable than AutoCAD and it was within reach for me for hobby and modeling projects. After I first trialed it I sold my model stash to buy the commercial license.

As a past user of AutoCAD, CATIA, TurboCAD, Solid Works etc, Rhino stands way above for me for ease of use and just a pleasant environment for getting on with model projects. The best way I can put it is that it is tune with how we model things in our hands but lets us do it first on a computer to see any 'gotchas' and improve the design before committing to cutting any wood.

https://www.rhino3d.com/sales/europe/Un ... ngdom/all/

So what is it? Rhino is a NURBS modelling software. It works much like CAD but is much more 3D design orientated.

https://www.rhino3d.com/features


The way most people use it is to start off very much like any CAD program with a 2D design. Then things get interesting, the 2D design is developed into a 3D model, it becomes very much like modeling objects in the hand, but is happening on your computer.

So how does that help us with ship modeling? Quite a lot, Rhino has many powerful features that make it very suitable for rapid hull design, ship models have lots of curves, what if we can create them in 3D then take any section we want from any point to form bulkheads, frames etc? What if we can look at the thickness of our planks attached to the model, define the rabbet all in 3D before making a wooden model. See how all the parts will fit together, tweak designs etc.

From a 3D model in Rhino it is easy to unwrap surfaces, so for example if one had a solid ply bulwark, this can be designed in 3D to fit the shape of the hull and then unwrapped to give an accurate 2-D template for laser cutting.

My most recent project was the development of small ship lanterns. I started with a 2D drawing, developed it into a 3D model I could examine. On the top was a cone, easily created in 3D. But I wanted this 'flattened' for photo etching. I just used one command to unwrap the surface and this is the 2D template needed to form the 3D cone out of brass sheet.


Any way thought I would put it out there, I have seen a few other Rhino users pop onto the ship forums but not much of their work posted up.

There is a 90 day free trial available:

https://www.rhino3d.com/download

Beware though, if you find you get on with Rhino you will be wanting to buy that license. ;-)
Last edited by GemmaJF on Sat May 06, 2017 1:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Rhino CAD

Post by GemmaJF » Sat May 06, 2017 12:44 pm

A quick demo of modeling in Rhino

Start with an image, could be a plan, photograph etc


Start with 2D construction lines, much as one would do when tracing a plan:
lantern image.jpg
lantern image.jpg (44.17 KiB) Viewed 566 times
I now want to make the cone on the top. I could do the geometry, but I am wondering how is it going to fit exactly with that little tube at the top? How is the base of the cone going to fit with the top of the lantern cage? What is going to look like, is the proportion right for what I wanted to make?

In 2D an outline of a slice through that cone is drawn it a closed 2D curve. It represents the material thickness of 0.1 mm:
Draw 2D closed curve.jpg
Draw 2D closed curve.jpg (63.11 KiB) Viewed 566 times

To make it 3D one can use the command 'revolve'. I want it to sweep through 360 degrees around the center line of the drawing, thus forming a 3 dimensional cone:
Cone.jpg
Cone.jpg (37.63 KiB) Viewed 566 times
The cone can now be fitted to other parts in Rhino, modified as required, examined etc.

From the cone I wanted a 2D template to form a photo etch. In effect having made it in 3D and decided it fits and I like the look of it, I want to flatten it out to make a 2D template.

The commands are

UnrollSfr (unroll or unwrap the surfaces of the 3D object)

It will do as it says, unroll all the surfaces, we will get a few surfaces generated,, the outside surface of the cone, the inside surface of the cone and a ring representing the base of the shape that was revolved. We want the surface that was on the outside, which is this one:
Unrolled surface of cone.jpg
Unrolled surface of cone.jpg (73.6 KiB) Viewed 566 times
That is a bit fussy for a template, I only want the outline, so from the Unrolled surface I use the command DupBoarder (duplicate border)

The result is a flat template, when cut out from brass sheet it can be formed into the shape of the cone needed for the top of the lantern. I used it to form a part on a sheet for photo etch.

The same technique could be applied to form a template for a bulwark, cutting the edges of bulkheads and frames etc. No need to draw each one, make the hull as a NURBS object following the moulded shape of the hull, and it can be used to slice the ends of any amount of bulkheads and frames in seconds.

If you have time to download the demo version, try making a cone, or any revolved shape, Start with a closed curve of any shape, some reference for the center of the shape to revolve around and see what you can make.
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Re: Rhino CAD

Post by GemmaJF » Sat May 06, 2017 1:11 pm

There was a bit more to the lanterns than just the cone, the one on the left shows that a 3 mm LED fits inside the lantern, the one on the right shows my first design which included a door for the lantern. In the end I abandoned the door idea, but the process in Rhino all helped to get a final design together.
Untitled-6 copy.jpg
Untitled-6 copy.jpg (58.45 KiB) Viewed 565 times
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Re: Rhino CAD

Post by GemmaJF » Sat May 06, 2017 1:34 pm

When you get some experience with Rhino, it can feel a lot like making a model in the real world. Commands like ''MakeHole' work almost like you have a drill in your hand, ready to bore a hole into the 3D model. There are many others such as 'WireCut', if you ever cut foam with a hot wire, you will get the idea of this command and exactly what it does to a 3D object in Rhino. :D

As model shipwrights the word 'loft' might grab the attention, we can loft a surface right through the outline of the bulkheads of a ship plan and make a 3D hull in just a couple of steps. Rhino also knows all about 'fair' curves, so includes tools to check a curve is fair and ways to correct those that are not.
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Re: Rhino CAD

Post by GemmaJF » Sat May 06, 2017 2:25 pm

Cones are a bit boring, so how about making a cannon with revolve?

Load an image of a cannon into Rhino, follow the outline of the drawing on say the top side using any form of curve that is convenient. Do not forget to leave the bore as a tube and also to close the curve, I made my cannon in two parts and hence two 2D closed curves for convenience:
Cannon outline.jpg
Cannon outline.jpg (16.86 KiB) Viewed 562 times
Use revolve, 3D cannons
Cannons.jpg
Cannons.jpg (35.86 KiB) Viewed 562 times
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Re: Rhino CAD

Post by Brian077 » Sat May 06, 2017 7:32 pm

wow, way over my head from a technical point of view, but interesting to see the technology behind it all.
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Re: Rhino CAD

Post by JosephH » Sun May 07, 2017 12:13 am

I tried Rhino I just like my solidworks way too much I guess after years using it and sometimes 3D max for stuff it is just a PIA for me to use. I am so used to everything else when I tried to use it I get lost. Also I like the accuracy of my solidworks. great job though. they say you can import Rhino files into solidworks but never works for me.
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Re: Rhino CAD

Post by GemmaJF » Sun May 07, 2017 6:21 am

JosephH wrote:I tried Rhino I just like my solidworks way too much I guess after years using it and sometimes 3D max for stuff it is just a PIA for me to use. I am so used to everything else when I tried to use it I get lost. Also I like the accuracy of my solidworks. great job though. they say you can import Rhino files into solidworks but never works for me.
I agree Joseph CAD is very much like that one can get so use to one program that learning another just seems like it is not worth the time investment.

I arrived at Rhino on a cost basis after a break from other CAD programs I had got very use to including Solidworks. That break meant I was getting rusty on the programs I knew well, so relearning on Rhino worked out. Not sure I could have made the jump or would have wanted to if I had still been up to speed on Solidworks.
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Re: Rhino CAD

Post by JosephH » Sat May 13, 2017 7:05 am

yes I took 2 yrs off solidworks because of a job and broken computer but I been using it almost since it came out so it only took me a couple weeks to get back up to speed.
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